Indigenous Mapping Network

Invitation to Tribal Members in San Diego to Welcome World Marchers

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Written by Paul Tooby

To the tribes of San Diego:

I am part of a small group of volunteers from both sides of the border in San Diego and Tijuana putting together a last minute welcome for the World March for Peace & Nonviolence, which is coming through San Diego on Dec. 3, uniting people across 100 borders on the way around the planet to the closing celebration Jan. 2 near the foot of Mount Aconcagua, tallest peak of the Andes.

I decided to support this cause because it is circling the entire earth and in this way I can add my voice to a million others around the world.

I want more than anything to send with others a loud call to make peace and nonviolence the priority – to show that people everywhere want to stop the madness and violence and division and come together as one human nation, respecting diversity as we feel deeply what we have in common as human beings. I am also finding that in working on the World March we meet great people who we want to keep working with in the future.

We know of tribes in other areas supporting the World March, from the Towa people of California to indigenous peoples of Bolivia and other places, and we would be honored if you can be present at the Dec. 3 event in San Diego to welcome the World Marchers who are walking to heal and unite our planet. Your presence can bring an important and often overlooked voice.

With a sincere hope that you are able to participate,

Paul Tooby
World March for Peace & Nonviolence Team, San Diego
USA http://www.worldmarchusa.net    International http://www.theworldmarch.org
San Diego http://worldmarch-sd.org    This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  
760-208-2597

More information and invitation to the “Celebration of the World March for Peace and Nonviolence,” welcoming the World March team to San Diego on Dec. 3 from 1-2:30 at Larsen Field in San Ysidro is at http://worldmarch-sd.org/Border.html
 

"Clues on the Map: Using Historical Maps to Recreate California Indigenous Landscapes in a GIS" Ruth Askevold on GIS Day 09

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Last Updated on Friday, 13 November 2009 20:44 Written by Rosemarie McKeon

The Indigenous Mapping Network invites you to attend Ruth Askevold's presentation at 
Berkeley’s Geospatial Innovation Facility on GIS Day November 18, 2009.  Her talk will be from 5:30 - 6pm. Ruth is the GIS Analyst, Historical Ecology for the San Francisco Estuary Institute. Her evening presentation is titled "Clues on the Map: Using Historical Maps to 
Recreate California Indigenous Landscapes in a GIS". Her presentation will examine how the Historical Ecology Program at the San Francisco Estuary Institute (SFEI) uses maps in a GIS to reconstruct historical landscapes, and how using these maps can help us understand native land management and landscape conditions at the time of colonization.

Ruth Askevold poster for IMN at UCB GIS DAY

Historical maps and narrative accounts of the San Francisco Bay area hold clues about the landscapes inhabited by California's indigenous peoples before Euro-American colonization. But because these maps and descriptions were created to protect colonial interests—and are not simply objective mirrors of what existed—they reflect the biases and perspectives of those who made them. Mapping practices included replacing California's Indian and Spanish/Mexican place names with new place names, imposing township and range lines over natural features, and using precision surveying techniques that replaced more descriptive maps. In this way, cartographers attempted to overwrite tribal environmental and cultural knowledge and impose a new order on the land.

This presentation examines how the Historical Ecology Program at the San Francisco Estuary Institute (SFEI) uses maps in a GIS to reconstruct historical landscapes, and how using these maps can help us understand native land management and landscape conditions at the time of colonization. SFEI’s approach includes georeferencing historical maps and textual data (explorer's narratives, newspaper accounts, and related map attributes) and allows for multiple interpretations of sources, as maps are combined and recombined in a GIS. Through examples from various San Francisco Bay Area watershed-based projects designed to support environmental restoration and management, I show how we can find clues on maps and traces on the land that allow us to consider native land management practices. Additional methods such as interviews with tribal members and large- scale eco-archaeological research are also considered.

For more information and additional events see:  http://gif.berkeley.edu/gisday.html
GIS Day 2009 at U.C. Berkeley is Organized by the Geospatial Innovation Facility and co-hosted by the Bay Area Automated Mapping Association (BAAMA) and Geospatial Innovation Facility (GIF), with support from the Northern California Region of the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS).

   

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